Licensure of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs):
Summary for Physicians

 Sb407 & hb 513: SUPPORT LICENSURE OF THE IBCLC

IBCLCs are collaborative members of the healthcare team whose professional Code of Conduct and Scope of Practice require accurate documentation and reporting to the primary healthcare provider.

We propose inclusion of documentation and reporting requirements from the IBLCE into the Nursing Board regulations for lactation consultants.  

IBCLC licensure will increase access to the most qualified and vetted lactation care providers.

        Poor duration rates signify the need for lactation support.

Breastfeeding families want and need professional lactation support as a standard of care in hospitals

and after discharge.

IBCLCs offer evidence-based clinical lactation care to enable successful breastfeeding,

fulfilling a public health imperative.

IBCLCs can provide a valuable service for physicians, enhancing primary care services in the medical home.

  • Licensure supports the integration of the IBCLC into a standard healthcare practice to prevent harm from poor feeding to safely maintain exclusive breastfeeding and to extend any breastfeeding.

  • IBCLCs work collaboratively with physicians in hospitals, physician offices, clinics, private practices, WIC and public health settings and are required to document and report to the primary care providers.   

  • IBCLCs do not encroach on the scope of practice of physicians, nurses, midwives or any other licensed healthcare provider.

  • Licensure of IBCLCs will enable physicians to direct-bill for lactation care in their offices, saving physician time and increasing profitability while improving patient satisfaction.

  • IBCLC care may reduce sick visits, especially for feeding difficulties, thereby supporting capitation limits and facilitating the goals of high quality, cost-effective healthcare.

  • Licensure by the state will identify a qualified lactation professional to alleviate physician concerns regarding negligent referral.  

  • State licensure meets insurer criteria and government regulations for provider credentialing.

  • Third-party reimbursement facilitates racial and socioeconomic healthcare equity.

 

Breastfeeding problems persist and result in weaning without lactation care.

✔ 73% of PA mothers want to breastfeed.

✔ 71% of mothers’ experience breastfeeding problems during their hospital stay.

✔ 92% of first-time mothers and 83% of ALL mothers have problems in the week after hospital discharge.

✔ 60% of mothers wean before meeting their own goals.

✔ Mothers without knowledgeable lactation support wean before they plan, depriving themselves and their  

     babies of the health benefits of breastfeeding and risking postpartum depression.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 2 Erin A. Wagner et al. Pediatrics 2013;13: e865-e875 ©2013 by American Academy of Pediatrics

 

Just a few contacts with an IBCLC triples the likelihood of breastfeeding at one year.

 

Efficacy of the IBCLC to improve breastfeeding initiation, intensity and duration is established by over 40 studies available at:  http://tinyurl.com/IBCLCefficacy

 

Licensure of the IBCLC within the Pennsylvania Nursing Board ensures rigorous preparation for professional and

clinical lactation care, assured communication with the primary care team, and state oversight.

INTERNATIONAL BOARD CERTIFIED LACTATION CONSULTANT

 

SUPERIOR TRAINING, EDUCATION, EXPERTISE

These prerequisites are the most stringent in the lactation field.

  • 90 hours of breastfeeding-specific education

  • 14 college level health science courses

  • 300-1000 clinical practice hours

  • rigorous exam

 

UNIQUE APPROACH TO COMPLEX PROBLEMS

  • evidence-based care

  • prevent harm from inadequate feeding

  • safe, individualized services

 

EMPOWERING WOMEN TO ACHIEVE THEIR BREASTFEEDING GOALS

Women have similar breastfeeding goals, but experience diverse hurdles.